How To Reline A Spinning Reel

You will have a better chance of catching big fish on the water if you equip yourself with a spooled spinning reel that matches the rod. Because you will most likely go home with no fish if your spooled spinning reel is poor and has tangled, twisted spins. This situation occurs when they are not set up correctly. If you know what to do, putting a new line on the reel should take no more than 10 minutes to do.

The following article will guide you on how to reline a spinning reel correctly.

Choosing Your Line

You need to choose a line that suits your needs because different lines, when used, will create various activities.

  • Monofilament: this is a single line with many stretches, flexible and flexible, suitable for float use, and ideal if you use jigs or live bait. Typically monofilament has a shelf life of about 2-3 years because this type of line is sensitive to sunlight. 
  • Fluorocarbon: this line should be used in shallow and calm waters as they are hard to see underwater. They have lower elongation and better wear retention. This line is also considered a monofilament, so it is suitable for fishing with jigs or live bait in clear water. However, if you use it on average, it is also necessary to change the cord once or twice a year.
  • Braided lines: If you are fishing in the bottom water, choose braided lines. This type of line is braided by thin wires made of synthetic materials and has better strength, does not stretch, and does not break easily. However, you should note that it is visible and should be selective. The shelf life of braided lines is the same as that of fluorocarbons but can be slightly longer.

Loading The Reel

Step 1: Make sure the line spool is not anti-clockwise

The easiest way to determine the correct direction is to hold the reel like you are fishing and spin it a few times to determine the direction of the revolution so that it rotates in the correct clockwise direction. It will prevent the wire from twisting and the line winding into the clockwise rotation shaft.

Step 2: Pass the rope through the lower eyes of the rod and fix it

The rod bottoms are a series of small circles that line the bottom of the rod and follow a straight line that stays in place. It will help your reel pull the cable into the spool like you are fishing. You tie a tree knot to fix the line to the spool. Trim the excess string and leave ¼ inch of the spare line from where you tied the knot.

Step 3: Open bail

A bail is a small handle that can be opened and closed by flipping up and down. Flip the bail up to open and down to complete when you’re done. During reeling, if there is an old fishing line on the spool, discard it.

Spooling Your Reel

Step 1: Close the bail and lay the spool flat on the floor.

It helps the line to enter the reel correctly. It would be best to lay the spool flat on the floor with the label facing up so that the cord exits the spool in the same direction as it enters the reel. However, if the line is twisted or not aligned when the label is facing up, turn it upside down. The thing to keep in mind is that for the braided fishing line, it will probably just swing around the spool and not spool into your spool. You may need to use a piece of monofilament at this point to keep the twine from spinning.

Step 2: Hold the line with your hands and spin the reel slowly

You use your fingers to hold the line at a distance of 12 inches (30cm) above the reel, then spin the reel slowly about 20 times and keep the rope sliding through your fingers. Then stop spinning so the line overlaps and check if the cable is twisted. If crooked, detach the line from the reel and re-align. And always keep the string from the finger holding to the rotation taut when loading the series into the revolution.

Step 3: Keep recording

After you have checked and made sure the line is not twisted, you can continue to add the wire and after 20-30 turns, stop to check if the wire is twisted.

Step 4: Continue spinning the reel until it is full 1/8 inch (0.32cm) from the rim.

Unlike baitcasters, the reel will be overloaded or tangled if you roll too much. Therefore, you should only move enough lines into the rotation and leave the excess 1/8 inch from the rim. You have enough lines to use at this level, even if you have to cut a large chunk of the line.

Step 5: Cut the line

Once you have enough wire, use a line cutter and cut the part close to the spool. Leave some extra to secure the lure, and you can also use the magnet or clip to secure the excess to prevent the line from sliding over the guides.

Step 6: Go fishing with your rod and reel.

Once you’ve finished spooling your reel, hook up your favorite lure and go fishing.

Conclusion

This article helps you to reline a spinning reel. You will have a better chance of catching big fish on the water if you equip yourself with a spooled spinning reel that matches the rod. Because you will most likely go home with no fish if your spooled spinning reel is poor and has tangled, twisted spins. This situation occurs when they are not set up correctly. If you know what to do, putting a new line on the reel should take no more than 10 minutes to do. The following article will guide you on how to choose the best line, how to roll it into the reel, and how to spool correctly.

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